Photography involves much more than just picking up a camera and taking a clear shot. It is more of an artistic expression. Many different techniques can be used in this particular art-form. To be a successful photographer, one must possess exceptional attention to detail and a feel for artistic beauty. Here is some advice to keep in mind.

Take the white balance into your own hands. Most cameras have a default white balance setting, but if you wish to have full control over your image, then you’ll want to set this manually. Using white balance properly can remove the yellow tint from your photographs and generally alter the entire mood of any shot.

Test varying shutter speeds to learn which speed works best for certain scenarios. With developed skills, you can stop the action, extend it in a creative montage, or bring special feature into focus. Fast shutter speeds are perfect for motion shots, whereas slower shutter speeds are good for natural, calm photographs.

Different shutter speeds create different effects. If you want to capture something on the move, using a low f value will shorten the exposure time, which eliminates motion blur. This comes in handy at sporting events or when photographing pets and children. Motion blur can be taken advantage of by using a shutter speed that is slow. Try taking a picture of running water with this method.

Food photography can be difficult. Food will melt or wilt quickly and reflect the light in unusual ways. Get all of your backgrounds, camera settings and other details worked out first, before you add the food, to get the “freshest” looking shot possible. Make sure you have the right lighting, and then put the food down and shoot!

When photographing people, remember that a person is so much more than a face. The human body provides a plethora of photograph opportunities.

If you’re photographing nature, take care. Before snapping the picture, take time to take in the scenery from every angle and figure out where you want to take the picture from. You should be careful not to disturb the natural settings that you photograph in order to leave them for others to find.

In outdoor photography, lighting is the most important element. The incorrect lighting can leave your pictures looking too dark, bright, or splotchy, essentially wrecking an otherwise great photograph. When you can, keep the sun behind your back when you take photos; or, when you have people involved, move them into a shaded area for the photo. The sun being behind you will naturally give you good lighting, reduce any solar glare and will help produce great pictures.

As you take photographs, also take notes. It can be hard to keep track of where your photographs were taken, or what you were feeling when it was shot. Use a notepad to write down photo descriptions as well as the file name or number of the photo.

By reading this article you now understand that photography is much more than taking technically correct, well-lit pictures. Doing so may have a dramatic impact on how good your photos look.